Set design, lighting design, and projections for theatre and dance. 

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Home Portfolio Archive for category "KAT"
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Disney’s Beauty and the Beast

KAT Company produces annually in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The venue is a proscenium house with a wide stage, low proscenium, and no movable flies. Beauty and the Beast is a show which wants to have a large variety of full-realized fanciful settings. To achieve this, the set consisted of three base-settings: The village, the forest, and the castle. These were changed easily using story-book flats. By simply turning the page on each unit, the next setting was displayed on stage.

Centered among these units upstage was a set of white drapes that received front-projections. The specific setting within the village or the castle or the forest was created by projecting media onto these curtains. For example, Belle entered the library of the castle through a large projected gothic wooden door, which then revealed thousands of books panning by her. She stopped at one shelf, reached into the curtain, and pulled out a single book to discuss from the image of the shelf (a crew member handed her a book when she reached into the drapes). read more

 
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Cinderella

A crucial design moment in this production is the transformation sequence at the end of Act I. The Fairy Godmother turns mice into horses, and a pumpkin into a carriage. This production made use of a white scrim and dance for this sequence. If I manage to get a video of the actual sequence, I will post it here.

We begin with the wagons onstage, and Cinderella with the mice by the fireplace. The puppet mice are all along the mantel and in the corners. The scrim flies in at the proscenium. The lights dim on the stage, as the first video (below) fades up. We led the audience to believe they were seeing the shadows of the puppet mice marching across the stage. Each morphs into the shape of a horse rearing. At that moment, we cross-faded back to the space behind the scrim,. where four dancers playing horses were posed in the exact positions of those projections. read more

 
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A You and Me World

A You and Me World was created from the writings of children from countries all over the world.   It featured an international cast, and won the prestigious NETC Moss Hart Trophy for Best Overall Production of 2002.

The design for the show consisted of a very presentational arrangement of platfprms, steps, and ramps that allowed fast-changing groups of children to present large, original musical and dance numbers.

Central to the design was a simple circular screen that provided constantly changing imagery and commentary throughout the show.   The earth itself was a recurring image for the screen, ultimately becoming a very photographic, three-dimensional revolving globe. read more

 
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Ananse the Spiderman

Ananse the Spiderman and the Golden Box of Stories is an original work based on an African folk hero.  The set is designed to accomodate the lead character, who swings around the stage on a long web.    There is also a large portion of the set upstage which is The Kingdom of the Sky People.   Many characters appear only here, all of them appearing only here, instantly, as a big scrim effect.

  

 
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Mail to the Chief

Mail to the Chief is an original musical based on letters written to the president by children.   This show was first produced in the summer of 2000. This show was a technological jump forward for a community children’s theate company in that it featured constant projections throughout the show using computers and data projectors with computer generated video animations.    The design used two screens, and the set itself was something of a cross between the American flag and the Lincoln Memorial. read more

 
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